Giant Schnauzer Dog Breed Information

Giant Schnauzer Dog Breed Information

Giant Schnauzer Dog Breed Information

Giant Schnauzer: The Giant Schnauzer is a working breed of dog developed in the 17th century in Germany. It is the largest of the three breeds of Schnauzer—the other two breeds being the Standard Schnauzer and the Miniature Schnauzer. Numerous breeds were used in its development, including the black Great Dane, the Bouvier des Flandres, and the German Pinscher. Originally bred to assist on farms by driving livestock to market and guarding the farmer’s property, the breed eventually moved into the city, where it worked guarding breweries, butchers’ shops, stockyards, and factories. It was unknown outside of Bavaria until it became popular as a military dog during World War I and World War II.

They have a dense coarse coat that protects them from the weather and from vermin. Giant Schnauzers come in two color patterns: solid black, and a color known as pepper and salt, with banded hairs of alternating white and black, appearing gray at a distance. Where legal, they are shown with cropped ears and docked tails. Like other schnauzers, they have a distinct beard and eyebrows. Today, the Giant Schnauzer participates in numerous dog sports, including Schutzhund. It is also used as a police dog.

Giant Schnauzer Dog Breed Information
Giant Schnauzer Dog Breed Information

Giant Schnauzer Puppies

The Giant Schnauzer should resemble, as nearly as possible, in general appearance, a larger and more powerful version of the Standard Schnauzer, on the whole, a bold and valiant figure of a dog. Robust, strongly built, nearly square in proportion of body length to height at withers, active, sturdy, and well-muscled. Temperament which combines spirit and alertness with intelligence and reliability. Composed, watchful, courageous, easily trained, deeply loyal to family, playful, amiable in repose, and a commanding figure when aroused. The sound, reliable temperament, rugged build, and dense weather-resistant wiry coat make for one of the most useful, powerful, and enduring working breeds.

The Giant Schnauzer should be fed a high-quality diet appropriate for the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) and activity level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet.

Giant Schnauzer Puppies Care

Giant Schnauzer Puppies photo
Giant Schnauzer Puppies photo

Giant Schnauzers require regular grooming. Their beard can collect drool and food particles, making frequent cleanings essential. If being shown, their coat needs to be stripped every two to four weeks. If they are simply a companion animal, the coat can be clipped instead. Some Giant Schnauzers have an allergy to shampoo.

Hip and elbow dysplasia are common. Giant Schnauzers are also prone to eye problems such as keratoconjunctivitis sicca, glaucoma, cataracts, multifocal retinal dysplasia, and generalized progressive retinal atrophy. They are also prone to skin diseases, such as seasonal flank alopecia, vitiligo, and follicular cysts. Cancer of the skin is common in dark-colored dogs, with the most frequently occurring varieties being melanoma of the limbs and digits, and squamous cell carcinoma of the digit. This susceptibility occurs because melanoma is caused by a defect in the melanocytes, the cells that darken the color of the skin. Noncancerous skin tumors are also common.

Some Giant Schnauzers develop central diabetes insipidus, autosomal recessive hypothyroidism, selective malabsorption of cobalamin, narcolepsy, cataplexy, and various seizure disorders. Some are also sensitive to sulphonamides and gold. Bone diseases and joint problems are also an issue. The most common causes of death in Giant Schnauzers are lymphoma and liver cancer, followed by heart attacks and heart failure.

Giant Schnauzer Size

  • A male Giant Schnauzer stands 25.5 to 27.5 inches at the shoulder and weighs 60 to 80 pounds. Females are 23.5 to 25.5 inches and weigh 55 to 75 pounds.

  • The Giant Schnauzer has the calm, loving temperament of a companion dog and the assertiveness, boldness, and energy required of a guard and working dog.

    He takes his responsibilities seriously and is protective of home and family, willing to defend them with a fierceness that can be intimidating. This is a territorial dog who’s distrustful of strangers, but when he’s not needed as a guardian, he’s a playful and affectionate companion.

    His intelligence can pose a challenge to the inexperienced trainer, however. Giant Schnauzers require consistent and firm guidance. Without it, they’re quite capable of thinking for themselves and running the household the way they think it ought to be run.

    As with every dog, Giant Schnauzers need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when they’re young. Socialization helps ensure that your Giant Schnauzer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Giant Schnauzer Rescue

Recommended daily amount: 3 3/8 to 4 1/4 cups of high-quality dog food daily, divided into two meals.

How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don’t all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog.

The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you’ll need to shake into your dog’s bowl. Keep your Giant Schnauzer in good shape by measuring his food and feeding him twice a day rather than leaving food out all the time. If you’re unsure whether he’s overweight, give him the eye test and the hands-on test.

First, look down at him. You should be able to see a waist. Then place your hands on his back, thumbs along the spine, with the fingers spread downward. You should be able to feel but not see his ribs without having to press hard. If you can’t, he needs less food and more exercise. Giant Schnauzers can be prone to gastric torsion and should be fed two or three small meals per day to avoid any build-up of gas.

Giant Schnauzer Puppy

Giant Schnauzer Puppy
Giant Schnauzer Puppy

Because of their size, energy level, and commanding nature, Giant Schnauzers are not recommended for homes with young children. The suggested age range is 12 and older who have the maturity to interact appropriately with a large-breed dog.

Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he’s sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog’s food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

Giant Schnauzers don’t tend to be buddy-buddy with other dogs, especially those of the same sex, and they probably shouldn’t be trusted alone with cats, no matter how well they seem to get along.

Giant Schnauzer Temperament

The Giant Schnauzer should resemble, as nearly as possible, in general appearance, a larger and more powerful version of the Standard Schnauzer, on the whole, a bold and valiant figure of a dog. Robust, strongly built, nearly square in proportion of body length to height at withers, active, sturdy, and well-muscled. Temperament which combines spirit and alertness with intelligence and reliability. Composed, watchful, courageous, easily trained, deeply loyal to family, playful, amiable in repose, and a commanding figure when aroused. The sound, reliable temperament, rugged build, and dense weather-resistant wiry coat make for one of the most useful, powerful, and enduring working breeds.

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